Sagebrush (7)

The Artemesia genus is commonly called Sage, Sagebrush, Wormwood and Sagewort, and includes both small, herbaceous plants, Sages, shown on a separate page, and larger shrubs, Sagebrush. They all have tiny, inconspicuous flower heads crowded along the stem and are pleasantly aromatic when the silvery-green leaves are crushed.

Artemisia tridentata

Big Sagebrush
Artemisia tridentata

Family: Sunflower  (Asteraceae)
AKA: Sagebrush
Photo taken on: September 4, 2005
Location: Walrod Gulch, GV, CO
Life Zones: Plains to montane
Habitat: Dry slopes

A woody, gnarled, many-branched shrub that grows to 7ft tall in vast colonies creating its own ecosystem. It is covered in fine hairs which give it a gray-green appearance. Leaves are three-toothed, wedge-shaped and aromatic when crushed.arrow

Artemisia tridentata

Artemisia tridentata

 

Tiny yellow flower heads bloom in September and remain on the plant even in the middle of winter.

Below are galls which are induced by insects. Galls are specialized plant tissue that provide a suitable microclimate and high quality food for the development of flies and midges.

Artemisia tridentata

Flora of North America reference.

Artemisia cana

Silver Sagebrush
Artemisia cana

Family: Sunflower  (Asteraceae)
AKA: Hoary Sagebrush
Photo taken on: August 21, 2007
Location: Swampy Pass Trail, GV, CO
Life Zones: Foothills to montane
Habitat: Moist open woods, meadows

Grows to 4ft with leafy stems. Leaves are long, narrow and hairy with no teeth.

Flora of North America reference.

Artemisia arbuscula

Low Sagebrush
Artemisia arbuscula

Family: Sunflower  (Asteraceae)
AKA: Little Sagebrush, Dwarf Sagebrush
Photo taken on: August 5, 2007
Location: Walrod Gulch, GV, CO
Life Zones: Foothills to subalpine
Habitat: Rocky soil, slopes

Grows to 12" spreading at the base with erect, leafy shoots. The lower leaves are toothed. Flower heads grow erect in a spike and are larger than other Sagebrush. Leaves, stems and bracts are covered in fine hair.

Artemisia arbuscula

Flora of North America reference.

Artemisia nova

Black Sagebrush
Artemisia nova

Family: Sunflower  (Asteraceae)
AKA: Black Sage
Photo taken on: September 23, 2013
Location: Abiquiu Lake, NM
Life Zones: Foothills to montane
Habitat: Dry slopes, mesas, pinyon-juniper, desert shrub
 communities where Big Sagebrush does not grow.

Grows in colonies with a low, rounded form to less than 2ft compared to Big Sagebrush. Plants grow with flower stalks sticking up from the top. Leaves are darker green than Big Sagebrush and not all so obviously three-toothed.

Flora of North America reference.

Artemisia filifolia

Sand Sagebrush
Artemisia filifolia

Family: Sunflower  (Asteraceae)
AKA: Silver Sagebrush, Silvery Wormwood, Sand Sage
Photo taken on: August 19, 2013
Location: Abiquiu, NM
Life Zones: Plains and foothills
Habitat: Rocky canyons, dry and sandy areas

Grows 3-4ft tall and wide with arching, feathery, silvery-blue foliage. Leaves and stems are covered with silvery hairs. The leaves are thread-like. Like other sages, the flowers bloom late and are tiny, yellow and inconspicuous.

Flora of North America reference.

Artemisia bigelovii

Bigelow Sagebrush
Artemisia bigelovii

Family: Sunflower  (Asteraceae)
AKA: Silver Sagebrush, Silvery Wormwood, Sand Sage
Photo taken on: August 12, 2014
Location: Ghost Ranch, Abiquiu, NM
Life Zones: Plains and foothills
Habitat: Sandy, rocky areas, pinyon-juniper woodland

Grows to 16" with a rounded shape covered in silvery hairs. The leaves are up to 1" long and have three teeth or a point at the tip. Compared to Big Sagebrush it does not grow as large and stays compact in shape. It is unique from other sagebrush by sometimes having a few ray flowers in its flower heads.

Flora of North America reference.

Artemisia ludoviciana ssp. albula

White Sagebrush
Artemisia ludoviciana ssp. albula

Family: Sunflower  (Asteraceae)
AKA: White Wormwood, Silver Mugwort
Photo taken on: September 4,2014
Location: Abiquiu, NM
Life Zones: Plains and foothills
Habitat: Sandy areas, canyons

Grows spreading in a bushy form to 2 ½ft with whitish green stems and leaves. Leaves are small and narrow without lobes. Flowers are tiny and grow in open clusters.

Flora of North America reference.

Yellow Long Clusters